Western “liberals” still not getting Modi’s demonetization move.

If you didn’t laugh at their cognitive dissonance … you’d laugh anyway

Cognitive dissonance is the gap between reality and what you would prefer reality to be. That gap gets filled with error and blindness when you can’t face up to what’s actually happening in the world. It’s thinking wishfully, with an edge of psychotic unreason. The Trump hysteria among Clinton Democrats and others in the USA (what Scott Adams calls “Trump Derangement Syndrome”) derives from an unwillingness to accept that their candidate was poisonously unpopular, lost the election, and that this is really for real.

The Leftish Naked Capitalism website, usually excellent on many matters, has been simply appalling in its coverage of India under Modi, and this I also put down to cognitive dissonance. It uncritically prints articles by notorious Congress Party frontmen inaccurate in details and wholly ideological in content.

Western stooges of Indian fake-liberal media and politico types have aligned their Gandhi-Clinton attitudes and agreed to mutually support each other for many years. Now they are both in agony and for its part Naked Capitalism is acting out its part in the nihilistic, post-modern identity politics activism that condemned Modi sight unseen as Adolf Hitler (it’s always Hitler with these dreary people). I wrote a book showing how stupidly wrong that assumption was and I’ve already spent enough time on it.

But this latest idiocy—endorsed by a writer who is normally very good—deserves some scorn (coming right up). I guess this is what happens when you have a fixed point of view, and then you simply apply it to an area you know only scantily, so that you’re ignorant of even very basic facts and end up looking like a fool.

I regard myself as a Liberal in the classic tradition, in favour of individual rights, liberty and free trade; or as Matt Ridley excellently reformulated it in a recent essay, a free-market anti-capitalist. But it’s revealing to find I have nothing in common with these Modi-hating liars who see themselves somehow as liberals, too.

It’s difficult to know where to start with how the Western media has traduced the so-called demonetization in India. I guess facts are the best way to go, unfashionable though that seems to be with the know-alls who hate Mod’s government.

A factual recap, for God’s sake

In November 2016 the 500- and 1000-rupee banknotes were abruptly withdrawn from circulation in India. This created queues at banks, and other inconveniences, but no major economic troubles ensued. I’ve written before about how the prices of groceries in the chowks didn’t go up at all, so supply chains were clearly not disrupted—India’s poor know how to cope, and they were behind Modi all the way. His popularity actually increased during the period.

The ordinary people supported Modi because he had prepared the ground by ensuring that 300 million (and counting) poor Indians had been given online bank accounts so they wouldn’t have to depend on cash—nor any longer on the vulture-like chit-wallahs who would “look after” their banknotes for extortionate fees.

The withdrawal of the notes was prepared in secrecy. Why? Because Modi wanted to help the ordinary Indians and India’s economy, and penalise the two parties guilty of abuse and corruption: rich Indians who profited from bribery and mostly kept their “black money” in cash (typically piles and stacks of 1000-rupee notes), and the Islamic forgers in Pakistan who were trying to undermine the Indian economy by flooding it with fake 500- and 1000-rupee notes. Surprise was vital.

The false way all this was reported was that Modi was doing away with the notes and trying to take India to a cashless, therefore authoritarian system. (In the West that’s apparently a brilliant move for democracy,  the same journalists say, but never mind …)

In fact, from the his very first announcement on the subject, Modi had explained carefully and slowly, for the hard to understand (journalists), that the old 500-rupee note and the old-1000 rupee note would very quickly be replaced by new ones, and in addition an entirely new 2000-rupee note would be minted to take account of the larger values of cash Indians were enjoying carrying around these days. I’ve put a photo of the new note at the head of this piece so you can see I am not making all this up. In simple terms: Modi was not demonetizing anything.

Did everybody get that? Not journalists, apparently. Endless articles appeared decrying the “chaos” and the failed experiment in a cashless economy. The Indian government had pledged (yes they had) to have cash levels back to normal quite soon and aimed at a January-February dateline for it. I think they got about 90% of the way there by the end of January. Now in India everything is back to normal, with two important exceptions: the beneficiaries of years of bribery winked at by Congress governments are  a lot poorer because their cash became worthless overnight, and the Indian poor are a lot happier with their lot and with Modi. Oh, and a happy by-product is that the Pakistanis have been badly hurt by it too because they cannot forge the new notes.

I know I’m banging my head against a brick wall with all this. To return to the piss-poor article at Naked Capitalism, the idiotic headline was “India’s Demonetization Experiment Fails to Demonetize: Cash Comes Full Circle”. Well, that’s what was supposed to happen all along. I don’t think that anything will ever get through the thick skulls of such fools, so why bother? And yet somehow one must point out lies, I suppose. It goes on:

Demonetization in India has been a debacle, and there is no end to the problems that it has created currently in sight. The best that can be said about it is that it might deter political leaders in other countries think long and hard before initiating similarly ill-conceived, premature efforts to try and nudge transactions away from cash and toward cashless payment systems.

All I can do is refer you back to the colourful photo of that brand-new 2000-rupee note.

“Reform, Perform, Transform”

Meanwhile, in defiance of the fake-liberal gloomsters, India’s economy marches ever upwards and its business-friendly environment continues to improve. A happier headline a few weeks ago related to how India has moved up in the ease-of-doing-business rankings since Modi was elected prime minister.

India’s old ranking, one week after Modi took office in 2014, was a pathetic 142nd, almost like some corrupt third-world state … Since then, it’s just been announced, India has rocketed 42 places to sit at 100, and that it is one of the ten most improved economies, especially in the areas of Resolving Insolvency (136 to 103), Paying Taxes (172 to 119 ), Getting Credit (44 to 29), Enforcing Contracts (172 to 164), Protecting Minority Investors (13 to 4) and Construction Permits (185 to 181).

It ranked higher than China in three of those categories.

Suck it up, Naked Capitalism.

 

Indian futures part 2: the luxury strategy

How can India counter the industrial giant on its doorstep?

In the previous post I briefly looked ahead to the relationship between India and the UK over the next few decades: it is only going to become deeper and more intertwined to the mutual benefit of both countries.

But India is also in the position now of crafting its own future as a “new” country, as Modi leads it out of the retardation after the Congress corruption of the last seven decades. What sort of culture and economy will India follow as part of its growing identity and prosperity? I suggest it will be determined partly by the political realities surrounding India and partly by the artisanal DNA that India possesses and must now cultivate anew and capitalise on.

Continue reading “Indian futures part 2: the luxury strategy”

What is this ‘demonetisation’ of which you speak?

Let’s cut through all the meretricious nonsense being written about the radical financial and fiscal reform Modi has unleashed.

‘India’s Prime Minister Has Singlehandedly Crushed The Economy With His Reckless Cash Ban’ runs the headline of one of the latest articles condemning the so-called ‘demonetisation’ unleashed by Modi in India. ‘Modi is quickly solidifying his place as one of monetary history’s biggest idiots’ it adds, before going on to display even more staggering ignorance and error than many of the other hundreds of similar articles on this subject have done.

Continue reading “What is this ‘demonetisation’ of which you speak?”

September upsum

A lot’s happened since Bharatiyata! started half a year ago. Let’s have a quick review of what this is all about …

I started this website back in February and now, just over six months later, I’m going to do a quick upsum to see how far we’ve come, where we’ve got to, what topics we’ve covered and where we’re going. It’s a drawing of breath before moving forward again.

First of all, I haven’t done much over the past month – in fact the work has been mostly behind the scenes as I’ve been ‘SEO-optimising’ the site (mind-numbing work) and bringing various things up to date. At the start I decided I wouldn’t take advertising on here because Bharatiyata! was not created to be a money-making vehicle, at least not in the short-term sense of scraping fractions of pennies from click-throughs. I have zero interest in that model of commerce. I’m trying to be generous with this site and am simply attempting to give information and insight to people who might be interested in those topics. Continue reading “September upsum”

New RBI boss Urjit Patel – just like the old boss?

Will the RBI’s new governor be a stalwart and hold the line against inflation as Rajan did?

In three days’ time Urjit Patel will take up his post as the Reserve Bank of India’s new governor. He was previously deputy governor, and his promotion – which had been mooted as influenced by Modi’s old-boys network (Urjit is a Gujurati Patel) – is probably no such thing, as Patel is the eighth deputy governor to be promoted to boss of the RBI. It is a tradition.

Continue reading “New RBI boss Urjit Patel – just like the old boss?”

No need to be negative – GST: India’s new goods and services tax

India’s imminent Goods and Services Tax (GST) will at last release the brakes of the Indian economy as everywhere else slumps into negativity

This does have to do with India’s GST, so please bear with me for a couple or three paragraphs.

Retail and commercial banks make money on the spread – the difference between the rate at which they charge interest on credit extended (money out – assets) and the rate at which they pay interest on deposits (money in – liabilities). Therein lies the problem with zero or negative interest-rate policies (NIRP, ZIRP) currently decreed by central banks. A bank cannot offer any interest to depositors if – because of ZIRP – its loans are paying anaemic income. Even if a bank receives, say, 2% on credit extended, it will not cover its costs – let alone make enough profits to survive in a competitive market – unless it offers -1% or less on deposits. Many banks, even Deutsche Bank, are already on the point of expiration and this regime will only make financial euthanasia across the industry the norm.

Continue reading “No need to be negative – GST: India’s new goods and services tax”

One million jobs a month

India’s massive and growing workforce represents either nightmare or dream scenario, depending on your outlook

Twelve million young people arrive on India’s job market every year; relentlessly, one million extra souls each month are looking to find work. There are two extreme ways of viewing this situation: either it’s an intractable disaster caused by massive overpopulation that is going to lead to starvation and economic meltdown, or it is the most blessed economic benefit that any country has ever experienced.

Because of its social structure – with large families and an agricultural basis, even now – a good proportion of India’s ceaselessly emergent workforce is simply absorbed into the fabric of the existing economy. The school-leaver will go to the field or behind the counter of the family business. That is not to say such a situation is economically efficient or ideal, or that it is best for a majority of the new workers, whose potential may be wasted in such unambitious occupations, adding only marginally to or even dividing the fortunes of family and country.

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That ‘7/10 businesses go broke’ statistic …

Everybody quotes it, but can it be true?

Regarding the cynicism expressed about India by Peter Ziehan (see previous post), I was pondering the real-life probabilities of India actually making economic progress beyond the mean of its previous performance. The so-called ‘Hindu rate of growth’ of barely above 1% – often the historical norm under the socialist state planning of the classic Congress/Gandhi-dynasty years –hopefully has disappeared forever. A better rate was jump-started back in the 1990s by the PV Narasimha Rao administration, and then continued by the BJP until they were ousted in 2004. By 2013 Congress had managed to put the brakes back on, but India is now pootling along at +7% growth per annum according to GDP. Granted, GDP’s a terrible measurement as it only counts economic activity, not profitability or productivity. But India’s is the best rate in a bad neighbourhood – the neighbourhood being this planet right now.

Continue reading “That ‘7/10 businesses go broke’ statistic …”

India underestimated (again)

For savvy investors, that can actually be a good opportunity

I recommend everybody to watch Peter Zeihan here as he delivers a barnstorming illustrated speech on the future of the world. He is a geopolitical analyst who for years worked at Stratfor, known as the ‘private sector CIA’ and has since struck out on his own. He is a great speaker, very funny, knowledgeable, engaging and stimulating.

I should warn that it is very much a Texan’s-eye view, and I am mentioning Zeihan mostly because he mentions India, at 47 minutes in, thusly:

‘The short version on India is that if you’re happy with it today, it’s not going to change a whole lot, the reason being that the Ganges basin is the most productive agricultural zone on the planet in terms of calories per acre per year. That gives you endless population growth. However, there is not a single navigable river in the country. So high populations, no capital. That’s abstract [sic: abject?], total, unending poverty. But India’s looked like this since the fifth century. So if this is an India you can operate in, an India you know and like – great! They are not a major player in Bretton Woods, never have been. They’re not going to change, but if you think India’s about to turn the corner, the whole ‘Shining India’ concept, I’m sorry. It’s looked like this for 1500 years; it’s not about to change.’

Continue reading “India underestimated (again)”

Why India? #2

India is finally waking from its slumber

Soon enough I hope to remove the question-mark from this series of posts even though that might appear optimistic given India’s track-record of (self-imposed) failures. I’m no Aunt Sally: I am not trying to look on the bright side, nor to poke around for morsels of good news among the gristly stuff. I’m not a Trümmerfrau either, picking among the wreckage and piling up the bricks and masonry strewn around the bombsite to start building an impossible future. I am in fact a hopeful skeptic rather than a pessimist.

For pessimism is an aspect of nihilism and nihilism is an aspect of narcissism, which is itself an aspect of solipsism. India has been subjected to quite enough of that.

India has also been the victim of skewed perceptions since Independence, and has mostly believed what it has been told.

For example, it is difficult to grasp the economic potential and promise of India, partly because in geographic terms it is relatively insignificant, covering much less than half the land mass of the USA or China – which are almost identical in size, at 3,805,927 and 3,705,407 square miles respectively – and only one fifth of the territory of Russia, which is 6,592,800 square miles excluding the Crimea.

Continue reading “Why India? #2”